Educate Yourself!

 

I'm Still Here: Black Dignity in a World Made for Whiteness by Austin Channing Brown (Convergent, $25.00)

"For readers who have engaged with America’s legacy on race through the writing of Ta-Nehisi Coates and Michael Eric Dyson, I’m Still Here is an illuminating look at how white, middle-class, Evangelicalism has participated in an era of rising racial hostility, inviting the reader to confront apathy, recognize God’s ongoing work in the world, and discover how blackness—if we let it—can save us all."


 

All Are Welcome by Alexandra Penfold (Knopf, $17.99) 

Join the call for a better world with this New York Times bestselling picture book about a school where diversity and inclusion are celebrated.

Discover a school where—no matter what—young children have a place, have a space, and are loved and appreciated. Follow a group of children through a day in their school, where everyone is welcomed with open arms. A school where students from all backgrounds learn from and celebrate each other's traditions. A school that shows the world as we will make it to be.


The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration by Isabel Wilkerson (Vintage, $17.95)

 

“The massive migration of black people out of the South during the 20th century is a subject that has never been truly examined in popular history. That oversight has been rectified in this magisterial work. Concentrating on three individuals, Wilkerson puts a human face on a movement that transformed American society on every level and brought the depths and heights of tragedy and triumph to those who had the courage to escape the oppression of Jim Crow.”

Reviewed by Bill Cusumano


The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America By Richard Rothstein (Liveright, $17.95)

"Essential… Rothstein persuasively debunks many contemporary myths about racial discrimination…. Only when Americans learn a common—and accurate—history of our nation’s racial divisions, he contends, will we then be able to consider steps to fulfill our legal and moral obligations. For the rest of us, still trying to work past 40 years of misinformation, there might not be a better place to start than Rothstein’s book."
Reviewed by Rachel M. Cohen