Sherman Alexie, author of You Don't Have To Say You Love Me

Tuesday, August 1, 2017 - 7:00pm to 9:00pm

inklings bookshop is pleased to present

Sherman Alexie, author of You Don't Have To Say You Love Me

A Handmaid's Tale (tv series review)

Did y'all read the The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood? Did anyone watch the tv series? What did you think so far?! If you're wondering whether or not to watch it, here's a review from the New York Times, by James Poniewozik

"A decade ago, Elisabeth Moss began co-starring in “Mad Men,” which among other things was about how women were objectified and subjugated — in the past, the 1960s, the bad old days.

In Hulu’s spectacular “The Handmaid’s Tale,” Ms. Moss is Offred, a baby-making slave in the Republic of Gilead, which is what part of the United States (New England, roughly) has become after a fertility crisis and a theocratic coup. It’s set in a near future that looks like the 1600s.

“Mad Men” may have resonated with today, but it gave viewers the comfortable vantage of history, the reassurance that we had come a long way, baby. “The Handmaid’s Tale” argues — with an assist from current events — that progress is neither automatic nor irreversible.

“The Handmaid’s Tale,” based on the 1985 Margaret Atwood novel, is a cautionary tale, a story of resistance and a work of impeccable world-building. It is unflinching, vital and scary as hell.

Offred had another name, before she was seized as breeding stock, her husband killed and her daughter taken by the state. Now she’s identified as the property of her “commander,” Fred Waterford (Joseph Fiennes). The name is a loaner. If Offred disappoints, she’ll be exiled to clean up radioactive waste with other “unwomen” until she dies, and another woman will be “of Fred.”

Her days are spent running errands in a commissary where the goods are labeled with pictures (because women should not read), or sitting quietly in a bedroom with shatterproof windows (so she can’t slash her wrists with a shard of glass). On “ceremony” nights, she mechanically copulates with the Commander while lying in the lap of his infertile wife, Serena Joy (Yvonne Strahovski).

The ritual, borrowed from the biblical story of Bilhah and Rachel, emphasizes that Offred is nothing more than a womb. So does her uniform: her face hidden by a bonnet, her form draped in a dress the red of menstrual blood and childbirth. (The costume design, by Ane Crabtree, is almost a character in itself.)

This is a dark story. That it’s not oppressive is a testament to the deft adaptation and, especially, Ms. Moss’s layered performance.

Offred is a captive. Nevertheless, she persists. She keeps a spark of self cupped in her hands. The series relies heavily on her narration, but not just for exposition. It’s how we hear her true voice, defiant, spirited, even mordantly funny. Passing the hooded bodies of three men hanged by the government — a priest, a doctor and a gay man — she comments: “I think I heard that joke once. This wasn’t the punch line.”

In the first three episodes — which debut on Wednesday, with new ones weekly thereafter — the showrunner, Bruce Miller, is faithful to the novel while expanding on it. (Hulu plans this as a continuing series, so it will presumably stray further eventually. Ms. Atwood is a consulting producer.)"

Read the rest here.

AMAZING Online Writing Course

 

 

 

 

 

Who else wants to do this?!  I (Susan R.) signed up for a six-week, online course on Writing with Flannery O'Connor. I've long been a fan on O'Connor's earthy, slightly creepy but fascinating prose and I'm excited to learn more about her writing philosophy and style. I'd love to have someone else from the Yakima valley join me in this endeavor.  You can read more about it and sign up here.  I hope you will. More about it below:

 

"Besides being a brilliant writer, Flannery O’Connor wrote quite a bit about the craft of writing. In this six-week online course, we will look at O’Connor’s essays about writing in Mystery and Manners, examine ways that she implemented her principles in her short stories, and implemented her principles in her short stories, and implement those principles ourselves in short writing exercises.

My goal as instructor will not be to get you to mimic O’Connor, but to help you find your own voice—to help you write in your native tongue, just as O’Connor wrote in hers. Though O’Connor wrote more or less exclusively about fiction, most of her principles are equally applicable to non-fiction narratives.

Below is a look at the introductory lecture of the course. Click here for full details. Class begins May 15."

Ardith Carratt and Stephen E. Murphy

Saturday, May 27, 2017 - 2:00pm to 3:30pm

inklings is pleased to present Ardith Carratt, author of The Pendant, and Stephen E. Murphy, author of On the Edge: An Odyssey

The Bear and The Nightingale

.The Bear and The Nighingale by By Katherine Arden

 

"I've always had a love of old Russian folktales and of the Vasilisa the Beautiful stories. She was a kind of a Russian Cinderella character. Vasilisa's father remarried after his first wife dies, his second wife is a cruel stepmother to Vasilisa. The Bear and the Nightingale is the Vasilisa story told so well. Arden specialized in French and Russian literature and lived in Moscow studying. The book is so atmospheric and magical. Lovers of old Russian literature will enjoy reading this book while they learn more about Vasilisa and the dangerous and magical life she lead." 

 

— Reviewed by Inklings employee, Sue D

The Most Anticipated Books of Spring 2017

It's time to sit outside and soak in that spring sunshine! Here is a great list of books from Publisher's Weekly. Call, email, or come on in and we'll order them for you, pronto:

 

Publisher's Weekly asked their reviews editors to pick the most notable books publishing in Spring 2017. Be sure to check out their picks for most-anticipated children's and young adult books for spring 2017, as well.

Fiction

Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders (Random House, Feb.) - A Dantesque tour through a Georgetown cemetery teeming with spirits, the book takes place on a February night in 1862, when Abraham Lincoln visits the grave of his recently interred 11-year-old son, Willie

 

The Refugees by Viet Thanh Nguyen (Grove, Feb.) - Pulitzer-winner Nguyen’s story collection features a young Vietnamese refugee who suffers profound culture shock when he comes to live with two gay men in San Francisco, and a woman whose husband is suffering from dementia and starts to confuse her for a former lover.

 

The Twelve Lives of Samuel Hawley by Hannah Tinti (Dial, Mar.) - A young girl moves back to the New England fishing village where her father, Hawley, finds work on the docks. But lurking over this family are mysteries, including the mother who died and the ghosts of Hawley’s past.

 

Ill Will by Dan Chaon (Ballantine, Mar.) - A psychologist in suburban Cleveland, Dustin is drifting through his 40s when he hears the news: his adopted brother, Rusty, is being released from prison. Thanks in part to Dustin’s testimony, 30 years ago, Rusty received a life sentence for the massacre of Dustin’s parents, aunt, and uncle.

The list is HUGE, take a look at the rest here.

Scott Sandsberry, author of A Difference in the Blood

Saturday, May 20, 2017 - 11:00am to 1:00pm

inklings bookshop is pleased to present

Scott Sandsberry, author of A Difference in the Blood

Independent Bookstore Day

Saturday, April 29, 2017 - 9:00am to 8:00pm

Join us at Inklings and celebrate your local indie! There will be indie exclusive merch (while supplies last), free swag, and 20% off your entire purchase with your Friends of Inklings bag!

10 Must-Read Books for April

Endgame10 Must-Read Books for April  Dispatches from the margins, dispatches from the mainstream. By Sarah Seltzer from Flavorwire

"This month is marked by writers sending dispatches from the margins and the mainstream. Whether tracing characters in a futuristic dystopia or following them into the unexplored past, whether it’s a Mediterranean murder mystery or a frank look at today’s Ivy League graduates or low-wage workers, a slice of the breadth of our world can be found in these ten selections.

Happy reading!"

1. Endgame, Ahmet Altan

Thanks to his career as a newspaper columnist, Turkish author Ahmet Altan is currently imprisoned by the Erdoğan regime. But he wears a different, more entertaining hat as a novelist. “Readers looking for a contemplative, twisty thriller will find this one unique and satisfying,” writes Kirkus of Endgame.Revolution of the Moon

 

2. The Revolution of the Moon, Andrea Camilleri

My family is obsessed with Camilleri’s detective novels. Here he resurrects a character from history: Donna Eleonora di Moura, the short-lived female viceroy of Sicily in the 17th century, “a woman whose courage and political vision is tested at every step by misogyny and reactionary conservatism.” Seems… relevant.

Read the rest, from Flavorwire HERE

Libro Audiobooks!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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